Thrillers that Make You Question Reality

Some books pull you into a different world so effortlessly, they make you question your own reality. Both thrilling and enthralling, these below authors warped our perception of reality and made us trust the narrative through twists and turns until the final reveal.

Our Little Secret by Lisa Jackson

#1 New York Times bestselling author Lisa Jackson puts a sexy, twisty, gender-reversed spin on Fatal Attraction in this addictive tale of escalating obsession, betrayal, and violent delights for readers of Peter Swanson, Allison Brennan, Carola Lovering and Stacy Willingham.

Secrets of Rose Briar Hall by Kelsey James

In this Gilded Age gothic homage to “Gaslight” starring Ingrid Bergman, a wealthy young newlywed in early 20th century New York is isolated within her opulent, yet ominously empty mansion by the charismatic and controlling new husband plotting to undermine her sanity. While this isn’t a traditional thriller, this eerie story is sure thrill readers!

The Good Girl by Mary Kubica

An addictively suspenseful and tautly written thriller, The Good Girl is a propulsive debut that reveals how even in the perfect family, nothing is as it seems.

Long Time Gone by Charlie Donlea

When DNA results reveal a disturbing connection to the mysterious disappearance of a famous baby nearly three decades ago, a woman’s search for answers draws her to an ominous small town in Nevada and a dangerous web of corruption, power, and lies in this engrossing, propulsive new novel from the internationally bestselling author of Twenty Years Later.

The Bitter Truth by Shanora Williams

An upstanding political candidate. A determined stalker. A shattering lost weekend. Amid the clashes and intrigue of the campaign trail, to what lengths will the elegant, all-too-devoted wife of a seemingly incorruptible politician go in the name of love, loyalty, and ego?

Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn

Camille Preaker faces a troubling assignment: she must return to her tiny hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls. She finds herself identifying with the young victims—a bit too strongly. Dogged by her own demons, she must unravel the psychological puzzle of her own past if she wants to get the story—and survive this homecoming.